Partipants – Orlando

Daniela Oliveira

Associate Professor
University of Florida
Research Areas: Employing warfare deception strategies to protect OS kernels
Bio: DANIELA OLIVEIRA is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Florida. She received her B.S. and M.S. degree in Computer Science from the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. She then earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Davis. Her main research interest is interdisciplinary computer security, where she employs successful ideas from other fields to make computer systems more secure.
Her current research interests include employing warfare deception strategies to protect OS kernels. She is also interested in understanding the nature of software vulnerabilities and social engineering attacks, especially how these attacks can be prevented from a Psychological perspective. She received an NSF CAREER Award in 2012 for her innovative research into operating systems’ defense against attacks using virtual machines and the 2014 NSF Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

Jeremy Epstein

Program Manager
DARPA
Bio: JEREMY EPSTEIN is a program manager in DARPA I2O, where he leads the Brandeis privacy program, and some other soon-to-be-named security programs. From 2012 to 2015, Jeremy was the lead program officer for the National Science Foundation’s Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program. His research interests include voting system security and software security. Jeremy received a B.S. in Computer Science from New Mexico Tech, and an M.S. In Computer Sciences from Purdue University, but never managed to finish his PhD at George Mason University.

Ann Cox

Program Manager, Cyber Security Division (CSD)
Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
Science and Technology Directorate (S&T)
Homeland Security Advanced Research Projects Agency (HSARPA)
Research Areas: Resilient Systems and Networks, Modeling of Internet Attacks, and Network Mapping and Measurement
Bio: Dr. Cox manages the Internet Measurement and Attack Modeling project (IMAM), which seeks to solve national security threats related to cyberspace. Prior to her work at DHS, Dr. Cox spent sixteen years at the National Security Agency (NSA) where she worked in the office of Weapons and Space before returning to research, focusing on network measurement projects. She provided leadership and technical direction for projects involving coordination with domestic and international technical experts from multiple government agencies, academic institutions, and private companies. Before coming to NSA Dr. Cox taught full-time at Brigham Young University (BYU) for several years, and was the owner and purchasing agent for a small business. She earned her Bachelorís degree in Mathematics from BYU, Masterís degree in Mathematics from Idaho State University, Masterís degree in Computer Science from James Madison University, and her Ph.D. in Mathematics from Auburn University.

Anna Squicciarini

Associate Professor
Pennsylvania State University
Research Areas: Data Privacy, Access Control, Information Security
Bio: Anna Squicciarini is an Associate Professor in the College of Information Sciences and Technology (IST) at the Pennsylvania State University . She received a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Milan. From February 2006 to December 2007, Squicciarini was a post-doctoral fellow at Computer Science Department of Purdue University under the supervision of prof. Elisa Bertino and Sebastien Goasguen. Squicciarini’s research interests are in the area of data security and privacy, with emphasis on access control mechanisms. Her work has been funded by industry and various funding agencies, including grants from the National Science Foundation (and a CAREER Award, 2015), Air Force, and Army Research Office. Squicciarini published more than 70 contributions as papers in international conferences and journals, and chapters in international books.

Bradley Huffaker

Research Scientist
University of California, San Diego
Research Areas: Computer networks, visualization, geolocation
Bio: Bradley Huffaker is a senior Research Scientist at Center for Applied Internet Data Analysis on the University of California, San Diego campus. His academic interests include visualization (AS Core visualization), understanding the Internet topology (as-rank.caida.org, ITDK), and the geolocation of Internet resources (geocompare). His current research includes an attempt to infer a geographically constrained AS customer cone. Bradley received his B.S.E and M.S.E degrees from the University of California, San Diego.

David Dittrich

Computer Security Researcher
University of Washington Tacoma Center for Data Science
Research Areas: Computer and Network Security, Incident Response, the Active Response Continuum, Research Ethics
Bio: Dave Dittrich is an applied Cyber Security Researcher in the Center for Data Science at UW Tacoma. He’s been investigating, studying, and countering computer crimes since the mid-1990s. He was the first to describe technical details of DDoS attack tools in 1999, was an early researcher into botnets, and one of the first to study P2P for botnet command and control. This lead him to research the ethical and legal bounds within which “white hat” researchers can justifiably act to respond to “black hat” hackers and criminals. He has written extensively on ethics and the “Active Response Continuum,” served for 6 years on one of the UW’s Institutional Review Boards evaluating human subjects research, and with Erin Kenneally co-edited the “The Menlo Report: Ethical Principles Guiding Information and Communication Technology Research” and “Applying Ethical Principles to Information and Communication Technology Research: A Companion to the Department of Homeland Security Menlo Report.”

David Ott

Research Director
University Research Office, Intel Labs, Intel
Bio: DAVID OTT is a Research Director for Intel’s University Research Office where he develops collaborative research programs that bring together top academic researchers and Intel R&D teams worldwide. David is a specialist in technology development for computer security and communications, and has worked for Intel since 2005 in a variety of technical roles focusing on security, communications, visual computing, performance analysis, software, and enterprise computing. David holds MS and PhD degrees in Computer Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Fabio Tagnin

Research Director
Intel
Bio: Fabio Tagnin is the Research Director for Intel in Brazil, responsible for defining strategic R&D engagements with public and private innovation institutions, and managing the Intel Labs relationship and programs with Brazilian Universities and Government. He has been a professor of Computer Science at PUC-SP, and Secure and Electronic Commerce at COGEAE’s Masters in Business Information Systems.
In the technology industry since the early 90’s, he has conducted software and hardware analysis for PC Magazine, managed hundreds of websites at UOL, and directed software development teams at several companies. Fabio holds a degree in Computer Science from IME-USP and a Masters in Business Administration from EAESP-FGV-SP. His Research Areas are Information systems, Information economy and productivity.

Fabian Monrose

Professor
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Research Areas: Systems security, privacy, information security
Bio: Fabian Monrose is a Professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He holds a joint appointment as the Director of Information Security at the Renaissance Computing Institute (RENCI). From 2002-2008, he was an Associate Professor at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests are in systems-oriented aspects of computer and information security, and he has published over 90 papers in prominent computer security and privacy venues. He has also served as a Program Chair or Program Committee member for several flagship conferences. Over the past 12 years, he has been the lead investigator or a co-investigator on grants and contracts totaling over ten million US dollars from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Defense (DoD), and industry. He currently serves on the Information Science and Technology (ISAT) study group for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA).

Jeffery Dewhurst

Program Management Specialist
BayFirst Solutions
Bio: Jeffrey Dewhurst is a Program Management Specialist with BayFirst Solutions, currently assigned to support the Cyber Security Division of the Science and Technology Directorate at the United States Department of Homeland Security. He received his B.A. degree from San Diego State University in San Diego, California.

Jim Kurose

Assistant Director
National Science Foundation
Bio: Dr. Jim Kurose is the Assistant Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE). He leads the CISE Directorate, with an annual budget of more than $900 million, in its mission to uphold the nation’s leadership in scientific discovery and engineering innovation through its support of fundamental research in computer and information science and engineering and transformative advances in cyberinfrastructure.
Dr. Kurose is on leave from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where he is a Distinguished Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences. He has also served in a number of administrative roles at UMass and has been a Visiting Scientist at IBM Research, INRIA, Institut EURECOM, the University of Paris, the Laboratory for Information, Network and Communication Sciences, and Technicolor Research Labs.

Kevin Butler

Associate Professor
University of Florida
Research Areas: Secure and Trustworthy data provenance, storage security, cyber physical systems, and mobile security and privacy
Bio: KEVIN BUTLER is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer and Information Science and Engineering at the University of Florida. He received his B.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering from Queen’s University at Kingston, Canada, and his M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University. He earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science and Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. His research focus is on securing computer systems and storage, with a focus on ensuring the trustworthy generation and management of information.
His current research interests include secure and trustworthy data provenance, storage security, cyber-physical systems, and mobile security and privacy. He received an NSF CAREER Award in 2013 for his research on using storage as a means of ensuring data security. He leads systems security research efforts within the Florida Institute for Cyber Security.

Manuel Egele

Assistant Professor
Boston University
Research Areas: Software security, Mobile Security
Bio: Manuel Egele is an assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boston Univserity. His research interests span all areas of systems security — in particular mobile and embedded systems security, privacy, and malicious code analysis. Prior to his appointment at BU, he was a systems scientist at Carnegie Mellon University. Before that he was a post-doctoral researcher at the Computer Security Group of the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He received his M.Sc. (2006) and Ph.D. (2011) degrees in computer science from the University of Technology in Vienna.

Marco Carvalho

Associate Professor
Harris Institute of Assure Information, Florida Institute of Technology
Research Areas: Network security, human-assisted automation, multi-agent systems, and data analysis.
Bio: Dr. Marco Carvalho is an Associate Professor at the Florida Institute of Technology, and a Research Scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition. He graduated in Mechanical Engineering at the University Brasilia (UnB ñ Brazil), where he also completed his M.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering with specialization in dynamic systems. Marco Carvalho also holds a M.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of West Florida and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Tulane University, with specialization in Machine Learning and Data Mining. At Florida Tech, Dr. Carvalho is the Executive Director of the Harris Institute for Assured Information, and the Harris Chair for Assured Information. He is responsible for the research and education programs in Information Assurance and Cybersecurity at Florida Tech, and is the principal investigator of several research projects sponsored by the U.S. Government and Industry.

Mark M. Tehranipoor

Intel Charles E. Young Preeminence Endowed Professor
Cybersecurity Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Florida
Co-director, Florida Institute for Cybersecurity Research
Bio: Mark M. Tehranipoor is currently the Intel Charles Young Preeminence Endowed Professor in Cybersecurity at ECE Department, the University of Florida. He is currently serving as co-director for FICS institute at UF. He has published over 300 journal articles and conference papers, two patents, 6 books, 11 book chapters, and has given more than 150 invited talks and keynote addresses. His projects are sponsored by both the industry (SRC, Texas Instruments, Freescale, Comcast, Honeywell, LSI, Mentor Graphics, Juniper, R3Logic, Cisco, Qualcomm, MediaTeck) and the Government (NSF, ARO, MDA, DOD, AFOSR, DOE, etc.).
He is a recipient of 12 best paper awards and nominations, IEEE awards, NSF CAREER award, and AFOSR MURI award. He serves on the program committee of many conferences, chaired many conferences and workshops, and served as AE for IEEE/ACM Transactions. He co-founded a new symposium called IEEE Int. Symposium on Hardware-Oriented Security and Trust (HOST) and NSF Trust-Hub. Prior to joining UF, he served as the founding director for CHASE and CSI centers at the University of Connecticut.

Matt Bishop

Professor
University of California Davis
Research Areas: Computer security, vulnerabilities analysis, election/e-voting, network security, data sanitization
Bio: Matt Bishop received his Ph.D. in computer science from Purdue University, where he specialized in computer security, in 1984. His main research area is the analysis of vulnerabilities in computer systems. This led to an interest in electronic voting and election processes. He was one of the members of the RABA study for Maryland, a member of the group analyzing the e-voting software used in the disputed Florida CD-13 election in 2006, and co-led the technical part of the California Top-to-Bottom Review, which performed a technical review of all electronic voting systems certified in the State of California. He is also interested in the insider problem, data sanitization, software assurance, and network security. He is the secretary of IFIP WG 11.8, dealing with computer security education, and is co-chair of the ACM delegation to the Cyber Education Joint Task Force. His textbook, “Computer Security: Art and Science”, was published in December 2002 by Addison-Wesley Professional.

Micah Sherr

Associate Professor
Georgetown University
Research Areas: Privacy and Anonymity
Bio: Micah Sherr is an associate professor in the Computer Science Department at Georgetown University. His academic interests include privacy-preserving technologies, electronic voting, wiretap systems, and network security. He participated in two large-scale studies of electronic voting machine systems, and helped to disclose numerous architectural vulnerabilities in U.S. election systems. His current research examines the security properties of legally authorized wiretap (interception) systems and investigates methods for achieving scalable, high-performance anonymous routing. Micah received his B.S.E., M.S.E., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania. He is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award.

Michelle L. Mazurek

Assistant Professor
University of Maryland, College Park
Research Areas: Usable security/human factors
Bio: My research focuses on computer security, with an emphasis on human factors. I’m interested in understanding security and privacy behaviors and preferences by collecting real data from real users, and then building systems to support those behaviors and preferences.

Scott Condie

Associate Professor
Brigham Young University
Research Areas: Asset Pricing, Market Microstructure
Bio: Scott Condie is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Brigham Young University. He received his PhD in Economics from Cornell University. His research focuses on the information content of market prices. His current research projects involve rational expectations equilibria under ambiguity and the pricing impacts and manipulability of order book information. His research has been funded by the Institute for New Economic Thinking and the Department of Homeland Security.

Stephanie Forrest

Distinguished Professor of Computer Science
University of New Mexico
Research Areas: Biology and computation, automatic software repair, large-scale security modeling, cyber-policy
Bio: Stephanie Forrest is Regents Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the Univ. of New Mexico in Albuquerque, where she served as Dept. Chair 2006-2011. She is also on the Santa Fe Institute External Faculty and recently spent one year at the U.S. Dept. of State working on cyber-policy. Forrest was educated at St. John’s College (B.A.) and The University of Michigan (M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science). Her previous work in computer security includes: the first practical anomaly intrusion detection system, automated intrusion response, instruction set randomization, automatic software repair, and more recently the strategic aspects of attribution. Awards include: the Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures (2013), the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award (2011), and the Presidential Young Investigator Award (1991). She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Wenjing Lou

Program Director
National Science Foundation
Bio: Wenjing Lou is Professor at Virginia Tech and Fellow of the IEEE. Since August 2014, Prof. Lou has been serving as Program Director at the US National Science Foundation (NSF), where her responsibilities include the Networking Technology and Systems (NeTS) program and the Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program. Prof. Lou’s research interests lie on the broad fields of wireless networks and cybersecurity. She is interested in complex cross-layer optimization problems that exploring new performance limits at the network layer by exploiting advances at the physical layer. She is also interested in developing, implementing, and evaluating privacy protection techniques in networked information systems and cross-layer security enhancement in wireless networks, by exploiting intrinsic wireless networking and communication properties.

William Robertson

Assistant Professor
Northeastern University
Research Areas: Systems security
Bio: William Robertson is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Northeastern University in Boston, MA, and co-directs the NEU Systems Security Lab. His research revolves around improving the security of operating systems, mobile devices, and the web, making use of techniques such as security by design, program analysis, and anomaly detection. He was involved in both the California Top-to-Bottom-Review (TTBR) and the Ohio EVEREST electronic voting machine reviews, and has extensive experience in organizing and participating in Capture-the-Flag security exercises. Prof. Robertson is the program co-chair for ACSAC 2015-2016, was the program chair of WOOT 2013, and was the chair of the DIMVA 2012. He has participated on the program committees of a number of top-tier systems security venues, including IEEE Security and Privacy, USENIX Security, ACM CCS, NDSS, and RAID. He is also the author of numerous peer-reviewed papers in the area of systems and network security.

Yao Liu

Assistant Professor
University of South Florida
Bio: Dr. Yao Liu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at University of South Florida. She received her Ph.D in Computer Science from North Carolina State University in 2012. Dr. Liu’s research is related to computer and network security, with an emphasis on designing and implementing defense approaches that protect emerging wireless technologies from being undermined by adversaries. Her research interest also lies in the security of cyber-physical systems, especially in smart grid security. Dr. Liu is a recipient of NSF CAREER Award 2016 for designing innovative channel based authentication techniques to secure and strengthen emerging wireless systems.

Anderson C A Nascimento

Assistant Professor
University of Washington (Tacoma Campus)
Bio: I am an assistant professor with the Institute of Technology of the University of Washington – Tacoma, and an adjunct professor with the department of Electrical Engineering – University of Brasilia. Previously, I was a researcher with the NTT Information Sharing Platform Laboratories (headed by Tatsuaki Okamoto), in Japan. I have obtained my Ph.D. degree from the University of Tokyo, Japan in 2004 in Information and Communication Engineering with a thesis in cryptology. I research in cryptology, information theory and information security. My current research interests are privacy issues in big data, social networks and geographical information system. I have published over 70 technical papers in conference proceedings and journals. My research has been funded by the Brazilian Army, the Ministry of Health in Brazil, Dell Computers, the Bank of Brazil, the European Union, The Royal Society, Intel Corp, the Brazilian National Council for Research and Development, University of Washington and the Brazilian Intelligence Agency. I am an associate editor of the IET Information Security Journal and I have been general chair or technical program committee chair of the following conferences: ICITS 2016 (Tacoma, USA), ISC 2016 (Hawaii, USA), SBSeg 2011 (Brasilia, Brazil), SBSeg 2009 (Fortaleza, Brazil). I have been selected as a panelist and reviewer for the National Science Foundation, The National Council of Research and Development of Brazil and the European Science Foundation. My Erdös number is 3.

Sonia Fahmy

Professsor of Computer Science
Purdue University
Bio: SONIA FAHMY is a Professor of Computer Science at Purdue University. She received her PhD from the Ohio State University in 1999. Fahmy’s research interests lie in the design and evaluation of network architectures and protocols. Her work is published in over 100 refereed papers, including publications in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, IEEE INFOCOM, ICNP, and ICDCS. She received the National Science Foundation CAREER award in 2003, and the Schlumberger foundation technical merit award in 2000. Her research has been supported by grants from the government and industry including NSF, DHS, Cisco Systems, HP, Northrop Grumman, Schlumberger, and Raytheon/BBN. Fahmy has served on the organizing or technical program committees of several conferences including ACM SIGCOMM, MOBICOM, SIGMETRICS, and CoNEXT, and IEEE INFOCOM, ICNP, and ICDCS, and on the editorial board of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. She is a member of the ACM, and a senior member of the IEEE.

Yier Jin

Assistant Professsor
University of Central Florida
Bio: YIER JIN is currently an assistant professor in the EECS Department at the University of Central Florida. He received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering in 2012 from Yale University after he got the B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Zhejiang University, China, in 2005 and 2007, respectively. His research focuses on the areas of trusted embedded systems, trusted hardware intellectual property (IP) cores and hardware-software co-protection on computer systems. He is also interested in the security analysis on Internet of Things (IoT) devices with particular emphasis on information integrity and privacy protection in the IoT era.
Dr. Jin is the guest editor of IEEE Transactions on Multi-Scale Computing Systems. Special Issue/Section on Hardware/Software Cross-Layer Technologies for Trustworthy and Secure Computing. He is also the associate editor of IEEE SMC Society Technical Committee on CCPS Newsletter. He serves and has served on the Organizing Committees and Technical Program Committees of many Conferences including DAC, ICCAD, ASP-DAC, HOST, ACNS, SecureComm, etc. He is the best paper award recipient of the 52nd Design Automation Conference in 2015 and the 21st Asia and South Pacific Design Automation Conference in 2016.

John Harris

Professsor and Chair, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
University of Florida
Bio: JOHN HARRIS is Professor and Chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Florida. Faculty hiring has been a major focus for Dr. Harris since starting as chair in August 2011.Under his leadership, the department has grown from 41 to 52 tenured/tenure-track faculty members in the last three years. The department has targeted several strategic areas including cybersecurity, neuroengineeing, machine learning and power systems. Together with the CISE department, the University of Florida recently hired seven faculty members in cybersecurity spanning all topics from hardware to software security and from hardware fabrication to human vulnerabilities. These seven faculty members work together in the newly formed Florida Institute for CyberSecurity (FICS) codirected by Mark Tehranipoor (ECE) and Patrick Traynor (CISE). The other members of FICS are Daniela Oliveira (ECE), Swarup Bhunia (ECE) and Domenic Forte (ECE), Kevin Butler (CISE) and Thomas Shrimpton (CISE). FICS is searching for top PhD students throughout the world in cybersecurity, including both hardware and software security.
Dr. Harris leads the Hybrid Signal Processing Group in researching biologically inspired circuits, architectures and algorithms for signal processing. Dr. Harris has published over 200 research papers and patents in this area. Dr. Harris received his BS and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1983 and 1986. He earned his PhD from Caltech in the first graduating class of the interdisciplinary Computation and Neural Systems program in 1991. After a two-year postdoc at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, he joined the faculty at the University of Florida in 1993.

Ken Calvert

Gartner Group Professsor in Network Engineering (NSF Expert)
University of Kentucky
Bio: KEN CALVERT is Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Kentucky. He was a developer of the GT-ITM Internet topology modeling tool. He has coauthored several books on programming with the socket interface. He holds a Bachelor’s degree from MIT, a Master’s from Stanford, and a from the University of Texas at Austin. He has been an associate editor of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, a faculty member at Georgia Tech, and a Member of Technical Staff at Bell Telephone Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ.
His current research interests include Internet architectures that expose and support policies of all stakeholders, economic and other incentives in multi-stakeholder networks, and information-centric networking. He is a member of the ACM and a Fellow of the IEEE.

Altair Olivo Santin

Full Professsor
Pontifical Catholic University of Parana
Research Areas: Network Security, Information Security, Internet Security, Computer Security and Computer Forenscis
Bio: Altair Olivo Santin received the BS degree in Computer Engineering from Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná, the MSc degree in Electrical Engineering and Industrial Computer from the Technological Federal University of Paraná in 1996, and the PhD degree in Electrical Engineering / Computer Security from Federal University of Santa Catarina – Brazil, in 2004. He is full professor of Security Systems at the Graduate Program in Computer Science of the Pontifical Catholic University of Paraná. His research interests in Computer Security include usage and access control models and mechanisms for distributed systems, Web Services Security, Cloud Computing Security, Intrusion Detection Systems and Digital forensics. Prof. Santin is member of the IEEE, ACM, and the Brazilian Computer Society.

Mario S Alvim

Assistant Professor
Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG)
Research Areas: Foundations of Information Security, Quantitative Information Flow, Privacy
Bio: Mario Alvim’s research interests are formal methods and the foundations of computer security. His research focus is the quantitative analysis of information flow and privacy, from an information-theoretic perspective. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Ecole Polytechnique (France) in 2011. In 2012 and 2013 he held a postdoctoral research position at the University of Pennsylvania (USA). Since 2013 he has been an assistant professor at the Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil). He is currently member of the PRINCESS, an INRIA associate team focusing on the protection of privacy and confidential information and the study of leakage of confidential information through public observables. In 2015 a paper co-authored by Mário has been awarded the 3rd Annual Best Scientific Cybersecurity Paper Competition, a competition sponsored yearly by NSA’s Research Directorate and reflects the Agency’s desire to increase scientific rigor in the cybersecurity field.

Wagner Meira Jr.

Professor of Computer Science
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Research Areas: Parallel and distributed systems, data mining
Bio: Wagner Meira Jr. obtained his PhD from the University of Rochester in 1997 and is Full Professor at the Computer Science Department at Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil. He has published more than 200 papers in top venues and is co-author of the book Data Mining and Analysis – Fundamental Concepts and Algorithms published by Cambridge University Press in 2014. His research focuses on scalability and efficiency of large scale parallel and distributed systems, from massively parallel to Internet-based platforms, and on data mining algorithms, their parallelization, and application to areas such as spam and malware detection and mitigation, information retrieval, bioinformatics, and e-governance.

Marinho Barcellos

Professor
Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)
Research Areas: performance & security cloud datacenter, software-defined/programmable & content-centric nets
Bio: Prof. Marinho Barcellos received a PhD degree in Computer Science from University of Newcastle Upon Tyne (1998). Between 1999-2008, Prof. Barcellos worked for UNISINOS university, and since 2008 has been a Professor at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS). He has authored many papers in leading journals and conferences related to computer networks, network and service management, distributed systems, and computer security, serving as both TPC member and TPC chair. Prof. Barcellos was the elected chair of the Special Interest Group on Computer Security of the Brazilian Computer Society (CESeg/SBC) 2011-2012. He is a member of SBC and ACM. His current research interests are datacenter networks, software-defined and programmable networking, information-centric networks and security aspects of these networks. He is the Program Co-Chair of IEEE P2P 2015, SBC SBRC 2016, and the General Co-Chair of ACM SIGCOMM 2016.

Luiz F. R. C. Carmo

Senior Specialist
Inmetro and UFRJ
Research Areas: Information Security, Software Evaluation
Bio: Luiz F R C Carmo received a B.S. degree on Electronic Engineering in 1984, and a M.Sc. degree on Computer Science in 1988, both from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Brazil, and the Ph.D. degree on Computer Science in 1994, from the Laboratory for Analysis and Architecture of Systems (LAAS/CNRS) in Toulouse – France. From 2002 to 2003, he spent a sabbatical period at the Research Center of the United Technologies Company in Connecticut – USA. From 1986 to 2008 Luiz Fernando was an active member of the research staff of the Computer Center of Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), and presently, he is a Senior Specialist in Computer Sciences of the Brazilian Institute of Metrology and Quality (INMETRO), responsible for developing new assessment programs of metrological embedded software. He is an active lecturer of the Doctoral program in Computer Sciences of UFRJ and the Head of the Master of Sciences program in Metrology and Quality of Inmetro.

Edmundo de Souza e Silva

Professor
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Research Areas: modeling and analysis of computer systems, machine learning and communication multimedia networks.
Bio: Edmundo de Souza e Silva received the B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in electrical engineering, both from Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro (PUC/RJ), and the Ph.D. degree in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1984. Edmundo was a visiting professor/researcher at renowned universities and research centers including the IBM T.J. Watson Res. Center, IBM Tokyo Res. Lab., UCLA Department of Computer Science, Computer Science Department at USC, Politecnico di Torino, IRISA/INRIA-Rennes, University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He is a member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. In 2008 he received the medal of the National Order of Scientific Merit. He is a professor of the Systems Engineering and Computer Science at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, COPPE. His areas of interest include the modeling and analysis of computer systems, machine learning and communication multimedia networks.

Daniel R. Figueiredo

Associate Professor
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ)
Research Areas: Network Science, Computer Networks, System ModelingBio: Daniel Ratton Figueiredo received a BS cum laude degree in Computer Science and MSc degree in Computer and Systems Engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) Brazil, in 1996 and 1999, respectively. He received a MSc and PhD degrees in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass) in 2005. He worked as a post-doc researcher at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL). In 2007, he joined the Department of Computer and Systems Engineering (PESC/COPPE) at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Brazil where he currently holds an associate professor position. He has a Research Productivity Fellowship granted by CNPq (since 2009) and is member of the Young Scientists Program granted by FAPERJ (since 2010). His main interests are in Network Science and Computer Networks, in particular modeling system dynamics in networks.

Jean Everson Martina

Adjunct Professor in Computer Science
Federal University of Santa Catarina
Research Areas: Human Factors, Applied Formal Methods, Security Protocols, Insider Threats
Bio: Graduated in Computer Science and M.Sc. degree in Computer Science from the Federal University of Santa Catarina (2001/2005), PhD in Computer Science from the University of Cambridge in the UK (2011). Adjunct professor in the Department of Informatics and Statistics of the Federal University of Santa Catarina since 2013, and visiting professor at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK since 2010. Has experience in computer science with an emphasis in Digital Certificate Management, Cryptographic Protocols, Embedded Systems, Formal Methods and Software Engineering focused on security of information. Works on the following topics: digital signatures, embedded operating systems, secure code execution, cryptographic key protection, computer forensics, formal protocols verification, security ceremonies modeling and verification and formal models for threat managements.

João Gondim

Assistant Professor
University of Brasilia, Department of Computer Science
Research Areas: Information Security, Network Security
Bio: He holds a degree in Electrical engineering from the Pernambuco Federal University, and an MSc Computer Science from the Imperial College of Science and Techniology, University of London; currently coursing a PhD in Electrical Engineering at Universidade de Brasília. His main research interests: network security, with emphasis on DDoS and persistent attacks; and information security, particularly attack executtion modeling

André Grégio

Research Scientist
Department of Information Systems Security – CTI Renato Archer
Research Areas: Malware counter-measures, OS and network security, security data analysis
Bio: André Grégio holds a PhD in Computer Engineering from University of Campinas (Unicamp), a MSc in Applied Computing from Brazilian Institute for Space Research (INPE), and a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from São Paulo State University (Unesp). Since 2009, he is a researcher at the Center for Information Technology Renato Archer – a Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation research center. He is also a collaborator-researcher at the Laboratory of Applied Security and Cryptography of the Institute of Computing/Unicamp. His interests include malware behavioral analysis, machine learning and biocomputing techniques applied to security data, operating systems and network security and privacy, and IoT defenses.

Paulo Lício de Geus

Associate Professor
Institute of Computing, University of Campinas
Research Areas: Network and System Security, Malware Behavior Analysis, Cloud Security, Mobile Security
Bio: Paulo Lício de Geus is an associate professor with the Institute of Computing, University of Campinas, SP, Brazil (IC-Unicamp), since 1984. Research interests include network and system security, network security management, computer security immune systems, malware behavior analysis, mobile security and cloud security. He also teaches Computer Networks, Operating Systems and Computer Security.

Diego F. Aranha

Assistant Professor
University of Campinas
Research Areas: Cryptography, Computer Security
Bio: Diego F. Aranha is an Assistant Professor in the Institute of Computing at the University of Campinas. He holds a PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Campinas and has worked as a visiting PhD student for 1 year at the University of Waterloo in Canada, and for 2 years as Adjunct Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Brasília. His professional experience is on Cryptography and Computer Security, with special interest in the efficient implementation of cryptographic algorithms and the design of cryptographic primitives for computational anonymity. Coordinated the first team of independent researchers capable of detecting and exploring vulnerabilities in the software of the Brazilian voting machine during restricted tests organized by the electoral authority. Received the Google Latin America Research Award for research on privacy and MIT TechReview’s Innovators Under 35 Brazil for his work in electronic voting.

Marcos A. Simplicio Jr.

Professor
Universidade de São Paulo
Research Areas: Cryptography, Information Security, Network Security
Bio: Was born in Itapeva-SP, Brazil (1983). He received his BSc (2006), MSc (2008) and PhD (2010) degrees in Electrical/Computing Engineering at the University of Sao Paulo, Escola Politecnica (Poli-USP), Brazil. He also has a Master degree (2006) in Engineering conferred by the Ecole Centrale Des Arts Et Manufactures (Ecole Centrale Paris), France. Currently he is assistant professor at the Department of Computer and Digital Systems Engineering, Escola Politecnica, University of Sao Paulo. His main research interests and the focus of the projects coordinated by him include: (applied) cryptography, including the design and analysis of algorithms and protocols; and network security, in particular solutions tailored for scenarios involving resource-constrained devices (e.g., sensor networks), and distributed systems (e.g., cloud computing and P2P networks).

Daniel Macedo Batista

Professor
Universidade de São Paulo
Research Areas: Computer networks, Performance evaluation, Security in computer systems and networks
Bio: Professor Daniel Batista is professor at the Department of Computer Science in University of São Paulo, Brazil since 2011. He holds a PhD in Computer Science since 2010 from State University of Campinas, Brazil. Currently, Professor Daniel is the coordinator of the GT-EWS project, a project funded by RNP (The Brazilian National Research and Educational Network) aiming the development of tools for an Early Warning System to protect RNP, in advance, against cyber-attacks. The main sources being used in the EWS are social networks and the results to date are promising. Professor Daniel finished the supervision of 1 PhD and 5 MSc in several topics in computer networks. Currently he supervises 3 MSc and 4 PhD in cybersecurity, smart cities and service-oriented computing.

Ricardo Felipe Custódio

Professor
Federal University of Santa Catarina
Research Areas: Information Security, PKI and Key Management Protocols, Finite Field and Applications
Bio: Ricardo Custódio obtained his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul in 1999. He is a Professor from Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) and supervisor of the Computer Security Laboratory (LabSEC). His research interests are key management protocols, public key infrastructure, cryptographic protocols, system security, finite field and applications.

Jeroen van de Graaf

Assistant Professor
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
Research Areas: Cryptography
Bio: Jeroen van de Graaf started research in cryptography in 1985 under supervision of David Chaum at the CWI. In 1998 he obtained a PhD from the Université de Montréal (1998), on quantum cryptography. In recent years his focus is on the theoretical and applied aspects of cryptographic protocols. He is particularly interested in unconditional privacy, including topics such as: quantum cryptography; protocols based on noise; authentication based on signal reconciliation; election and mixing protocols; general two- and multi-party computation; randomness etc. Many of these protocol borrow techniques from information theory and coding theory. Since March 2011 he is assistant professor at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.

Priscila Solís

Professor
University of Brasilia, Department of Computer Science
Research Areas: Computer Networks, performance evaluation, cloud computing
Bio: Priscila Solís holds a degree in Systems Engineering, Informatics and Computing from the University Francisco Marroquin in Guatemala, Master in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the Federal University of Goiás and Phd in Electrical Engineering from the University of Brasilia (2007). He has worked professionally in computer science in several private and public companies. Member of the SBC (Brazilian Computer Society) and SBC Regional Secretary for the Federal District. She is currently associate professor and member of the Distributed Systems and Computer Networks Group at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Brasilia.

Roberto Gallo

Chief Scientist
Kryptus Information Security
Research Areas: Security aspects of cyber-physical systems, autonomous cyber-defense systems, cryptography, and architectural-centric security
Bio: Dr. Roberto Gallo works with information security for more than 15 years as research, practitioner, and industry evangelizer. As chief scientist at Kryptus Information Security, Roberto conceived and designed dozens of information security systems for critical applications. His research interests are broad and include security aspects of cyber-physical systems, autonomous cyber-defense systems, cryptography, and architectural-centric security. Roberto is a laureate of “Casimiro Montenegro Filho” Ph.D. thesis contest, by the Brazilian Presidency of Republic.

Edna Dias Canedo

Associate Professor
Gama Institute, Universidade de Brasília
Research Areas: Privacy in Cloud Computing, Information Technology and Information Security.
Bio: Edna Dias Canedo is graduated in Systems Analysis by Universidade Salgado de Oliveira; Goiás (1999). Master degree by Universidade Federal da Paraíba UFPB in the domain of software engineering (2002) and Doctorate in Electrical Engineering by Universidade de Brasília (2012). She is an associate professor of the Software Engineer Course in the Gama Institute, of the Universidade de Brasília in the domains Privacy in Cloud Computing, Information Technology and Information Security.

Aldri Santos

Associate Professor
Federal University of Paraná
Research Areas: Solutions in presence of attacks on routing and data dissemination services in Internet of things, wireless ad hoc networks and sensor networks.
Bio: ALDRI SANTOS is an Associate Professor in the Department of Informatics at Federal University of Paraná (UFPR). He is PhD in Computer Science (2004) from the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Master in Informatics (1999) and Bachelor of Information Technology (1995) from UFPR. He has developed research in the following areas: network security, fault tolerance, availability, data dissemination, wireless ad hoc networks and sensor networks. Aldri is chair of the Special Commission on Information Security and Computer System (CESeg) of the SBC (Brazilian Computer Society). His current research interests include solutions in presence of attacks on routing and data dissemination services in Internet of things, wireless ad hoc networks and sensor networks.

Michele Nogueira

Associate Professor
Federal University of Paraná
Research Areas: Wireless networks, security and dependability
Bio: Michele Nogueira is Professor of Computer Science at Federal University of Paraná, where she has been since 2010. She received her doctorate in Computer Science from the University Pierre et Marie Curie – Sorbonne Universités, Laboratoire d’Informatique de Paris VI (LIP6) in 2009. She was a Visiting Researcher at Georgia Institute Technology (GeorgiaTech) and a Visiting Professor at University Paul Sabatier in 2009 and 2013, respectively. Her research interests include wireless networks, security and dependability. She has worked on providing resilience to self-organized, cognitive and wireless networks by adaptive and opportunistic approaches. Dr. Nogueira was one of the pioneers in addressing survivability issues in self-organized wireless networks, being the works “A Survey of Survivability in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks” and “An Architecture for Survivable Mesh Networking” her prominent scientific contributions. She has been a recipient of Academic Scholarships from Brazilian Government on her undergraduate and graduate years, and of international grants such as from the ACM SIGCOMM Geodiversity program. She is also Associate Technical Editor for the IEEE Communications Magazine and the Journal of Network and Systems Management.